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of actions violate u.s. laws and international treaty obligations. this conclusion is not based upon our own personal impressions, but rather, is grounded in a hoe row and detailed examination of what constitutes torture from a historical and legal context. we looked at court cases and determined that the treatment of detainees in many instances met the standards. the courts have determined constitute torture. in addition, you look at the united states state department, in its annual country reports on human rights practices, has characterized many of the techniques used against detainees in u.s. custody in the post-9/11 environment, the state department has characterized the same treatment as torture, abuse, or cruel treatment when those techniques were employed by foreign governments. the c.i.a. recognized this in an internal review and that many of the interrogation techniques it employed were inconsistent with policy, positions the united states has taken regarding human rights. the united states is understandably subject to criticism when it criticized another nation for engaging in tor
the decision and, of course, i'm not second-guessing anybody. i did talk to a law enforcement officer over the weekend who, first of all, said, you know, it would have been much better for us all if this had been plotted out of a cave in afghanistan instead of, you know, an apartment in cambridge. >> one among us. >> yeah, one among us. but also he was saying not so sure about them shutting down the entire city and the message that that sends. you talk about copycats. the copycat said if i do something particularly heinous, i can hold an entire city hostage. >> one of the purposes of terrorists is to disrupt and forcing a city shut down and the rest, she used that end in addition to killing and injurying that you do. one of the reasons -- i don't want to second-guess the tactical decision to lock down boston. but i don't think this is something that if you will a scaleable or sustainable. >> no, we can't do this. >> imagine these guys hadn't been captured and all that. >> after what happened to the boston marathon in an internationally visible way. we were covering this all morning long. i
of retirement and health care benefits is consistent with what is required by the federal law of ups, federal express and every other almost every other corporation in the country it would be very similar. >> it could be different from what the private sector companies are doing. i would like to know, i would like to make that available to the postal employees that i represent throughout the country. >> you are correct but it's not the same for health care benefits. i will provide a more detailed record. >> you are saying the postal service now is operating at 140% of current revenue; is that the number you gave? >> drm laes, unfunded liabilities. >> bankruptcy would probably be where they are. >> finally let me go to something completely unrelated. you testified he wanted more flexibility in their rates in respect to packaging the monopoly on first-class they would have it facto monopoly on the third clause catalogs and what people would refer to as door hangers and nobody has the reach you do. how do you give that flexibility without giving you the power to do sweetheart deals and take the
laws that prevent that. organizations -- about whetherns there have been improvements generally within the afghan government and specifically related to united states contracts for goods and services? >> the n.e.a. that allowed the u.s. to cease contracting with the enemy was very helpful. if you had indication with a contractor or subcontractor was associated with the enemy we could immediately stop that contract. i read the recent investigator general of a chemist and's report, how to take that legislation further. i absolutely support that. it would expand that be on the department of defense so other u.s. government agencies could also have the same authorities we have been given as a result of that very helpful legislation, and also to address a different level of contracts in the past have been over $100,000. as would bring it down to a level below that. i do think we have had some improvement in that particular area as a result of that legislation. continuing to move in that direction would be very helpful. >> thank you. one last question. thechairman asked you about afghan inte
obviously will affect complying with the law of the land if we have to. i may follow-up -- do you you right now have intentions for a timetable of when the department would get back to the committee on its intention and plan for complying -- >> this is evolving and i have that they the review are leading, and then we will proceed on that basis. i don't want an expectation here that isn't correct. that is why wanted to make sure. -- i understand what is expected. as to your bastions about overseas, overhead, and the other observations you made about how we are assessing what we have to do to comply with these new realities. consolidatingeen and closing facilities overseas for the last few years. we will have a study complete by the end of this month -- this on additional recommendations on closing facilities and consolidating overseas. so, yes, that has been ongoing. i and thee time, president think, the leadership of the doj, but we also need to look at our infrastructure in this country as well. >> can i have a couple of facts -- we transferred more than 100 sites back to our allies since
Search Results 0 to 4 of about 5